State sanctioned abuse

Yesterday in the High Court some extraordinarily brave women were told that their human rights claims against the Metropolitan Police will have to be heard in the secretive Investigatory Powers Tribunal. These women were all the subject of undercover policing that involved sexual encounters with police officers - in many cases these encounters became long term intimate relationships. The exposure of this police tactic has caused enormous embarrassment to the Met - hence their eagerness to have the claims heard in secret, without the women being allowed to hear the evidence and without a right of appeal. Thankfully the High Court yesterday ordered that other important parts of the claims could remain in the open High Court.

Read more

Section 44 - 12 years on

During the last decade or so the UK has been the stage for a legislation extravaganza in the name of counter-terrorism and national security. Such laws, often hastily passed and draconian in nature, have been the source of much debate. Twelve years ago today Parliament passed the first in this controversial series of statutes – the Terrorism Act 2000.

Read more

Security without humanity

If a nation’s greatness is measured by how it treats its weakest members, then the case of Liberty client "FGP" should be serious cause for concern. FGP was detained in an immigration detention centre pending his removal from the UK. During his detention he developed severe abdominal pains and had to be rushed to hospital, where he was admitted for almost nine days. FGP was not a criminal. He was not a risk to the public.

Read more

Wandsworth Council backs down over threat to evict innocent family

19 January 2012

Today Wandsworth Council announced it has backed down over plans to make Liberty client Maite de la Calva and her young daughter homeless. The authority had previously threatened to evict the family if Ms de la Calva’s son was convicted of a crime committed during last summer’s riots. He was jailed earlier this month but the Council has now agreed not to pursue eviction in the courts following a meeting with Liberty.

Read more

Slavery law Liberty lobbied for in action

Incredibly, up until April last year it wasn’t actually a criminal offence in this country to hold another person in slavery or servitude. Thanks in part to lobbying by Liberty, such modern day slavery was finally outlawed, with a new offence brought into English law through the Coroners and Justice Act 2009. This week, in London, we saw one of the first convictions under this new legislation that we campaigned so hard for.

Read more